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Mental Health Awareness Week

Mental Health Awareness week this year is running from the 8th to the 15th May 2017!

Every single person in the world has mental health! But not every single person has good mental health! This page has video’s and links on to give you as much information as possible about mental health and how it affects Young People.

Mental Health issues affect 1 in 10 Young People in the UK and is becoming more common as society and technology develops!

The video’s below are part of the #iamwhole campaign which was participated in by many Young People in the UK

 

 

 

 

 

Your emotional wellbeing is just as important as your physical health. Good mental health allows children and young people to develop the resilience to cope with whatever life throws at you and grow into well-rounded, healthy adults.

Things that can help keep you mentally well include:

  • Being in good physical health, eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise
  • Having time and the freedom to play, indoors and outdoors
  • Being part of a family that gets along well most of the time
  • Going to a school that looks after the wellbeing of all its pupils
  • Taking part in local activities for young people.

Other factors are also important, including:

  • Feeling loved, trusted, understood, valued and safe
  • Being interested in life and having opportunities to enjoy themselves
  • Being hopeful and optimistic
  • Being able to learn and having opportunities to succeed
  • Accepting who they are and recognising what they are good at
  • Having a sense of belonging in their family, school and community
  • Feeling they have some control over their own life
  • Having the strength to cope when something is wrong (resilience) and the ability to solve problems.

 

 

These are some of the mental health problems that can affect children and young people.

  • Depression affects more children and young people today than in the last few decades, but it is still more common in adults. Teenagers are more likely to experience depression than young children.
  • Self-harm is a very common problem among young people. Some people find it helps them manage intense emotional pain if they harm themselves, through cutting or burning, for example. They may not wish to take their own life.
  • Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) can cause young people to become extremely worried. Very young children or children starting or moving school may have separation anxiety.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can follow physical or sexual abuse, witnessing something extremely frightening of traumatising, being the victim of violence or severe bullying or surviving a disaster.
  • Children who are consistently overactive (‘hyperactive’), behave impulsively and have difficulty paying attention may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Many more boys than girls are affected, but the cause of ADHD aren’t fully understood.
  • Eating disorders usually start in the teenage years and are more common in girls than boys. The number of young people who develop an eating disorder is small, but eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa can have serious consequences for their physical health and development.